Term 3

**TERM 3 OUTLINE & MATERIALS**


Wednesday, January 18 (A-Day)  +   Thursday, January 19 (B-Day)

  1. Welcome to a new semester!
    1. Review of classroom rules, expectations, and procedures
    2. “Welcome to Ms. Whiting’s Classroom” Handout
  2. Introduction to Argument Letter assignment about Drones
    1. For next couple days, all English students will be responding to the following writing prompt (link below) that includes articles to read and reference in order to respond to the prompt. We reviewed briefly the expectations of an argumentative writing piece, went over the writing prompt, and read the article together.
      1. Argumentative Letter Writing Prompt and Articles
      2. Argumentative Letter Writing Instructions
    2. This letter must be PRINTED and the following items needs to be stapled together:
      1. Your argumentative letter
      2. Outline of your essay
      3. The packet with the writing prompt and annotated articles
      4. **If you do not have access to a printer at home, please let Ms. Whiting know and we can make other accommodations
  3. Went to the computer labs to work on this in class (will also have next class period to work)

Friday, January 20 (A-Day)  +  Monday, January 23 (B-Day)

  1. No journal prompt today
  2. Reviewed requirements for Argument Letter Assignment about Drones (see January 18/19 for materials and instructions)
  3. Went over what a formal letter should look like
    1. Formal Letter Template and Hints Handout
  4. Went to the computer labs to work on this in class
    1. This letter is DUE NEXT CLASS PERIOD:
      1. A-Day: Tuesday, January 24th
      2. B-Day: Wednesday, January 25th
    2. This letter must be PRINTED and the following items needs to be stapled together:
      1. Your argumentative letter
      2. Outline of your essay
      3. The packet with the writing prompt and annotated articles
      4. **If you do not have access to a printer at home, please let Ms. Whiting know and we can make other accommodations

Tuesday, January 24 (A-Day)  +  Wednesday, January 25 (B-Day)

  1. JOURNAL PROMPT: “Starry Night”
    1. The following questions connect to the painting below. Respond in journal:
      1. Study the painting. What are your eyes drawn to first?
      2. Then consider this quote from van Gogh to his brother Theo: “Looking at the stars always makes me dream. Why, I ask myself, shouldn’t the shining dots of the sky be as accessible as the black dots on the map of France?” What do you think he meant by this?
      3. In what ways does van Gogh make the stars accessible? / In what ways do the stars contrast with the village?Starr Night
  2. **ARGUMENT DRONES ESSAY/LETTER DUE**
    1. This letter must be PRINTED and the following items needs to be stapled together:
      1. Your argumentative letter
      2. Outline of your essay
      3. The packet with the writing prompt and annotated articles
  3. Passed out Term 3 Grace Card Passes (**not available electronically, get from Ms. Whiting)
  4. Went over our Argument Drones Essay/Letter by following the instructions outlined in the power point link below. This power point was printed and given as a package to students to utilized at a future reference:
    1. RAINBOW ESSAY HIGHLIGHTING INSTRUCTIONS
    2. We sill be revising and working on this essay a little more for improvement so will want to take this process seriously to reflect on what needs to be changed for the future

Thursday, January 26 (A-Day)  +  Friday, January 27 (B-Day)

  1. NO JOURNAL PROMPT
  2. Now having finished out Argument Letter about Drones, time was given in class to utilize the changes outlined from our previous revising activity on January 24/25th, and made those changes online.
    1. For those who did not have their essay ready to were have used this time to finish their rough draft or rainbow edit their essay (see Jan 24/25 for instructions) so they can make revisions in the future
      1. **Once finished, students were to “share” or send me a copy of their essay to my e-mail
  3. Reviewed our discussion of “Starry Night” by Van Gogh
  4. Biography of Van Gosh
    1. Analyzed the symbolism behind the cypress tree used in “Starr Night”
    2. In small groups, students read a biography about Van Gogh:
      1. Van Gogh Biography
    3. INSTRUCTIONS:
      1. Read the biography about Van Gogh
      2. Underline/Star any portions of his life that might have influenced how he decided to paint starry night
        1. For example: Can you see his life in…
        2. the colors he chose?
        3. the type of brushstrokes he used?
        4. the symbols he chose?
        5. the size of things in the painting?
      3. Need to keep this for next class period!
  5. Compared Van Gogh’s popularity of his paintings when he was alive to their selling prices and importance today

Monday, Jan. 30 (A-Day)  +  Tuesday, Jan. 31 (B-Day)

Journal Prompt — “The Astronaut”  This is a creative response! Tell the story surrounding this photograph. You make up the story! How did this astronaut get here? Are they going anywhere? Where does this take place? Etc.

  1. Tell this story - astronautReviewed our discussion of “Starry Night” by Van Gogh and his biography
    1. Van Gogh Biography
  2. Introduced synthesis and took the following notes in our Writer’s Journals:
    1. Download (PDF, 448KB)

    2. Created and filled out the following chart in groups and as a class about the Starry Night painting and Van Gogh’s biography to be able to analyze the material and synthesize it: 

      Download (PDF, 465KB)

    3. Now that we analyzed all the evidence from both sources, filled out the following chart (**see Ms. Whiting for example we filled out in class):

      Download (PDF, 29KB)

    4. **STEP 4: We wrote the paragraph in our Writer’s Journal**

Wednesday, February 1 (A-Day)  +  Thursday, February 2 (B-Day)

Journal Prompt — “I Wonder”  **THIS IS FOR A-DAY CLASSES (Period 1 & 4) ONLY**

 

I Wonder Journal Prompt

  1. Finished filling out the Synthesis Chart for Van Gogh’s Starry Night and his biography (**see Ms. Whiting for example we filled out in class)

    Download (PDF, 29KB)

    1. **STEP 4: Wrote the paragraph in our Writer’s Journal**
  2. Listened to and read the following song lyrics by Don McLean of “Vincent (Starry, Starry Night)”
    1. Students were split into small groups taking a section and analyzing connections between the two and then discussed as a class. Tookes notes in the margins of the poem
    2. Will synthesize this material next time

Download (PDF, 157KB)


Friday, Feb. 3 (A-Day)  +  Monday, Feb. 6 (B-Day)

Journal Prompt — “IQ or EI” Answer the following questions below:

  1. IQ or EIListened to and read the following song lyrics by Don McLean of “Vincent (Starry, Starry Night)”
    1. Students were split into small groups taking a section and analyzing connections between the the song and Van Gogh’s painting “Starry Night” and his life and then discussed as a class. Took notes in the margins of the poem. Then discussed as a class. (*see Ms. Whiting for notes)
      1. Download (PDF, 157KB)

    2. Now that we understand the song a little better, students in partners/groups did the following:
      1. INSTRUCTIONS
        1. Fill out a new synthesis chart (this skill we practiced last time as a class) for ONE of the following two sources:
          1. Don McLean’s Song “Vincent” + Van Gogh’s painting “Starry Night”     OR
            Don McLean’s Song “Vincent” +  “Vincent Van Gogh” Biography by The Art Story
        2. Write your synthesis paragraph in Step 4 on a separate piece of paper
        3. Staple your paragraph to the Synthesis Chart and turn in to our class basket
      2. Download (PDF, 29KB)


Tuesday, Feb. 7th (A-Day) + Wednesday, Feb. 8th (B-Day)

** If not finished last class period, BLUE Synthesis Chart for Don McLean’s Song + Painting OR Biography with STAPLED paragraph is DUE TODAY **

Journal Prompt — “Favorite Teacher” : Answer the following questions below

Favorite Teacher Writing Prompt

  1. Took a Literary Terms Pre-Test
    1. This was to merely see where students are at in their knowledge of certain literary terms. In no way are they graded on what they do or do not know as we have yet to cover these concepts in class. They will be given points for participation in doing the Pre-Test.
  2. Read the following story on your own or in partners
    1. “Love” by William Maxwell
    2. Download (PDF, 53KB)

  3. Re-read “Love” again but this time looking for moments/hints that Maxwell used to foreshadow and suggest what is going to happen to Miss Brown
    1. To find foreshadowing, Circle/underline any phrases/words that fit the following categories that Maxwell used to hint and Miss Brown’s fate:
      1. Funeral/Cemetery Imagery
        1. Maxwell’s use of language evokes funeral and cemetery images
      2. Flower Imagery
        1. Flowers are beautiful when they are young, but even in their beauty they begin to wilt and die
        2. Flowers also often represent certain ideas or meanings
      3. Use of Language
        1. Any phrases/statements that also suggest Miss Brown’s fate
  4. Re-grouped as a class and brainstormed ideas on the board as a class
  5. Will finish this activity next time!

Thursday, Feb. 9th (A-Day) + Friday, Feb. 10th (B-Day)

Journal Prompt — “Playlist” : Look at the two music listeners below and brainstorm song names that you think they would be listening to. Have about 8 ideas to share!

Playlist Brainstorm

  1. Reviewed the story “Love” by William Maxwell we read last time
    1. Last class period, we noted that Maxwell used language to convey certain ideas and meaning to foreshadow Miss Brown’s fate in the story. Now that we see how effective language is in conveying those ideas, we went over the vocabulary/terms that these methods of using language are called.
  2. Introduction to Figurative Language
    1. Handed out the “Literary Vocabulary” Graphic Organizer and “Term 3 ACT/SAT Vocabulary Words” List
    2. Download (PDF, 313KB)

    3. Download (PDF, 224KB)

    4. These two handouts are going to be very important this term! Unlike the vocabulary the last two terms, all of these vocabulary words are types of figurative language and are used often in writing to express certain ideas. Each section is separated based on what type of figurative language it is and each box only required: the Definition of the word and and Example of how that figurative language would be used (no longer requiring picture drawing)
      1. For Example: instead of trying to use “Metaphor” in a sentence for my example, I am going to write an example of a metaphors such as, “The tree is a skyscraper towering over the forest below.”
    5. We went over the following Power Point in order to fill out the Graphic Organizer:
      1. Literary Terms and Figurative Language Power Point
      2. Download (PPTX, 8.29MB)

  3. Revisiting and Revising Argument Letter about Drones
    1. Now having finished  Argument Letter about Drones, time was given in class to apply changes noted from our previous revising activity on January 24/25th, and made those changes online.
    2. We have already done a revising session and this is the second one we have had in class. This is the final time to make last changes to essays before being graded.
    3. For those who did not have their essay ready to were have used this time to finish their rough draft or rainbow edit their essay (see Jan 24/25 for instructions) so they can make revisions on thier own time at home
      1. **Once finished, students were to “share” or send me a copy of their essay to my e-mail** –> I will be grading the essays electronically so this is how they need to be turned in

Happy-Valentines-Day-PNG

Monday, Feb. 13th (A-Day)  +  Tuesday, Feb. 14th (B-Day)

Journal Prompt: Answer one or both of the following questions: How do you determine what is good and what is evil? Is it okay to do something wrong in order to accomplish something you want or believe is right?

  1. READ THE FOLLOWING INSTRUCTIONS to know what we did today (Links to materials needed below in blue)
    1. Download (PDF, 106KB)

  2. The “Macbeth: If the Crime Fits” Activity is not available electronically –> talk to Ms. Whiting
  3. Materials for the “Should Shakespeare be read in school” Argument:
    1. Article 1 and Article 2: Two Teacher’s Perspective on Shakespeare in School
    2. Synthesis Worksheet for “Should Shakespeare be read in school” Argument
    3. **Read the instructions in the document above in order to know how to do this assignment!

Wednesday, Feb. 15 (A-Day) + Thursday, Feb. 16 (B-Day)

No Journal Prompt Today

  1. Read the following instructions for what we did today in class. All materials needed are linked below in blue:
    1. Download (PDF, 70KB)

  2. Here was the “Mini-Research, Infographic Assignment” Sheet that outlines the project and examples of infographics:
    1. Download (PDF, 4.06MB)

  3. Here were the research topics you could have chosen from and the links to the articles you are to read with them:
    1. The Rise of London
      1. Overview of London
      2. The Rise of London and the Society
    2. Daily Life (Eduction, Clothing)
      1. The Daily Life of London: Education and Clothing
    3. Daily Life (Food, Family, Festivities)
      1. The Daily Life of London: Food, Family Unites, and Holidays
    4. Elizabethan Sports and Pastimes
      1. Sports and Pastimes in Popular Use in Shakespeare
    5. Health, Hygiene, and Disease
      1. Overview of the Healthy, Hygiene, and most common Diseases
    6. Magic and Superstitions
      1. Overview of the Belief in Magic and Superstitions during the Age
    7. Shakespearean Playhouses and The Globe
      1. Overview of Shakespearean Playhouses
      2. Indoor Theaters
      3. Facts about The Globe
      4. The First Globe Theater
    8. The Globe Theater Today
      1. The Reconstruction of the Third Globe
      2. Conversations of the Globe Today
    9. Shakespearean Theater (Special Effects, Costumes and Cosmetics)
      1. Special Effects in Theater during Shakespeare’s Time
      2. Costumes and Cosmetics used in Theater during Shakespeare’s Time
    10. Shakespearean Theater (Actors and Audience)
      1. The Actors of Shakespeare’s Plays
      2. The Audience of Shakespeare’s Plays
  4. IF YOU WERE ABSENT THIS DAY:
    1. Choose one of the topics listed above (A-J)
    2. Read about that topic.
    3. Create a mini infographic (on a normal sized paper)
    4. On the back of your infographic, write the transcript of what you would have said in your presentation if you had been there to present.
    5. Turn it in to the basket the next time you come to class.

Will finish presentations next time!


Monday, February 20th — NO SCHOOL

presidents-day


Friday, Feb. 17 (A-Day) + Tuesday, Feb. 21 (B-Day)

Writer’s Journal — “Analogies” For your journal, follow the instructions below.

Grocery Store Analogy Journal Prompt

  1. Finished Shakespeare Topic Information Presentations!
  2. Went over the second part of Figurative Language words #22-32 looking at the following power point:
    1. Download (PPTX, 13.17MB)

    2. Missing Vocabulary materials? Click the links below:
      1. “Term 3 Figurative Language Vocabulary Words” List
      2. “Literary Vocabulary” Graphic Organizer
  3. Introduction to Macbeth:
    1. Went over the following information on the Power Point in order to fill out the “Macbeth Helpful Information Worksheet”
    2. Download (PPTX, 4.86MB)


Tuesday, Feb. 22 (A-Day) + Wednesday, Feb. 23 (B-Day)

Writer’s Journal — “Ambition” In your writer’s journal, answer the questions below:

Ambition Writer's Journal Prompt

  1. Finished Figurative Language Vocabulary Words #15-21 by looking at the following power point while filing out Figurative Language Vocabulary Chart:
    1. Download (PPTX, 5.65MB)

    2. Missing Vocabulary materials? Click the links below:
      1. “Term 3 Figurative Language Vocabulary Words” List
      2. “Literary Vocabulary” Graphic Organizer
    3. DON’T FORGET: Figurative Language Vocab Midterm Words #1-21
      1. A-Day: March 1st
      2. B-Day: March 2nd
  2. Went to the computer labs  to work with the school counselors to begin the process of registering for classes for 11th Grade, Junior year of high school!

Friday, Feb. 24 (A-Day) + Monday, Feb. 27 (B-Day)

Writer’s Journal — “Report Card”

Report Card Journal Prompt

  1. Reviewed Figurative Language Vocabulary + Review Game
    1. Students were given a chance to review their vocab words and then the class played a review game to prepare for the Vocab Midterm Next Time
      1. DO NOT FORGET: Figurative Language Vocabulary #1-21 Midterm Quiz Next Time!
  2. Continued Introduction to Macbeth:
    1. Went over the following information on the Power Point in order to fill out the “Macbeth Helpful Information Worksheet”
    2. Download (PPTX, 4.86MB)

  3. Synopsis and Character Chart for Macbeth:
    1. As a class, we then went over the plot line and characters of Macbeth. The purpose of this activity is to give student a resource and background knowledge before we begin reading the play so that while sifting through the language of Shakespeare, there is still a general understanding of the plot and what is going on.
    2. Went over the following information in the Power Point below:
      1. Students were to fill out the Macbeth Character Chart while Ms. Whiting went through the power point and gave a review of the plot.
        1. Boxes on the chart indicate places you want to take notes about each character to help remember who they are
        2. Arrows indicate places where you want to note the relationship between characters and the actions they do towards one another
      2. **IF YOU WERE ABSENT**: Click on the following link to briefly read about the story of Macbeth: Brief  Plot Synopsis of Macbeth
      3. Download (PPTX, 7.5MB)


Tuesday, February 28th — NO SCHOOL

**ACT TEST DAY FOR 11th Graders**

(10th and 12th Grades do not need to come to school that day but teachers are still available after lunch for any questions of conferencing students may need)


Wednesday, March 1 (A-Day) + Thursday, March 2 (B-Day)

  1. Writer’s Journal:
    1. A-Day: No Writer’s Journal
    2. B-Day: Writer’s Journal — “Invisible”
      1. Look at the picture below and in your journal tell the story behind the picture
  2. **FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE VOCAB MIDTERM: Words # 1 – 21**
  3. Finished going over the following information in the Power Point below:
    1. Students were to fill out the Macbeth Character Chart while Ms. Whiting went through the power point and gave a review of the plot.
      1. Boxes on the chart indicate places you want to take notes about each character to help remember who they are
      2. Arrows indicate places where you want to note the relationship between characters and the actions they do towards one another
    2. **IF YOU WERE ABSENT**: Click on the following link to briefly read about the story of Macbeth: Brief  Plot Synopsis of Macbeth
    3. Download (PPTX, 7.5MB)

  4. Went over the following handout as a class to discuss the ways in which reading a play is different than reading a novel and what to look for in preparation for reading Macbeth next time
    1. Download (PDF, 478KB)


Friday, March 3 (A-Day) + Monday, March 6 (B-Day)

  1. Writer’s Journal — “Fate” Look at the statement and question below and write your thoughts on the subject and your answer in your writer’s journal.
  2. What is fate?
  3. Macbeth: Act 1, Scenes 1-2
    1. No Fear Shakespeare CoverAs a class, we began to read the beginning scenes of Macbeth. Below I have posted links to the online and PDF forms of the No Fear Shakespeare version of Macbeth.
      1. No Fear Shakespeare is a publication that gives you the complete, original text and language of Macbeth on the left-hand page, side-by-side with an easy-to-understand translation on the right.
      2. No Fear Shakespeare ONLINE
      3. No Fear Shakespeare PDF
    2. We read Act 1, Scenes 1-2 as a class, taking notes on the meanings of certain phrases to determine the plot-line of the scenes and importance of some of Shakespeare’s choices. We considered some of the following questions:
      1. What do you think that means?
      2. Why place that element there and what could be its purpose?
      3. How does this help us visualize or understand something?
      4. What does is sound like?
      5. Does it connect to a moment in the play later?
      6. How does this help Shakespeare tell his story? Does it tell us something about the character’s personalities or characteristics? Does it establish setting? Create theme? etc.
    3. **IF YOU WERE ABSENT: Read Act 1, Scenes 1-2 by clicking the links above to be prepared to start where we left off last time

Tuesday, March 7 (A-Day) + Wednesday, March 8 (B-Day)

Writer’s Journal — “Your Future” Read the question below and write your thoughts on the subject and your answer in your writer’s journal.

Future Journal Prompt

  1. Macbeth: Act 1, Scenes 1-2
    1. No Fear Shakespeare CoverAs a class, we finished reading the beginning scenes of Macbeth. Below I have posted links to the online and PDF forms of the No Fear Shakespeare version of Macbeth.
    2. No Fear Shakespeare is a publication that gives you the complete, original text and language of Macbeth on the left-hand page, side-by-side with an easy-to-understand translation on the right.
    3. No Fear Shakespeare ONLINE
    4. No Fear Shakespeare PDF
  2. Introduced the P.L.O.T. / S.I.F.T Chart
    1. Handed out the following worksheet to the class: Macbeth PLOT/SIFT Chart
    2. Download (PDF, 66KB)

    3. As a class, we filled out the P.L.O.T. part of the chart to help us solidify and remember what we read from Act 1, Scenes 1-2
    4. Introduced S.I.F.T.
      1. SIFT is the method we will be using to takes notes on the Figurative Language we have been learning in class and how we see it being used in Shakespeare’s Macbeth
      2. Get out your vocab packet!
          1. “Term 3 Figurative Language Vocabulary Words” List
          2. “Literary Vocabulary” Graphic Organizer
      3. Students were split into groups of 3-4 and each groups took with one of the designated boxes on their PLOT/SIFT Chart below, finding examples of the following vocabulary words:
        1. Box 1 (Symbol): Simile, metaphor, euphemism, symbol, hyperbole, understatement, imagery
        2. Box 2 (Imagery): imagery, personification, onomatopoeia, allusion, motif
        3. Box 3 (Figurative Language): parallelism, repetition, paradox, assonance, alliteration, rhetorical question
        4. Box 4 (Theme): What possible themes is this scene addressing? (look at your topic list on your pink Character Chart for ideas) Remember, to make a topic into a theme, ask yourself: “What does Shakespeare think about that topic?”
        5. Box 5 (Then): Elaborate/explain how specific moments or specific examples of figurative language help us to see or understand that whatever theme you chose in Box 4
      4. In their groups, they focused on just one box on their PLOT/SIFT chart, looking for examples of our Figurative Language Vocabulary in Macbeth that has been assigned to them accordign to the list above
        1. Rgropued and share SIFT ideas with the class to help one another fill out the chart
        2. Finished “Theme/Tone” and “Then” of the SIFT Chart as a class
    5. **IF YOU WERE ABSENT: Read Act 1, Scenes 1-2 by clicking the links above to be prepared to start where we left off last time.
      1. Look at the following sample below to copy on your own blank PLOT/SIFT Chart: 

        Download (PDF, 103KB)


Thursday, March 9 (A-Day) + Friday, March 10 (B-Day)

No Journal Prompt Today

  1. Macbeth: Act 1, Scene 3
    1. No Fear Shakespeare CoverAs a class, we read LINES 30-90 from the original text in Act 1, Scene 3 of Macbeth as a class. Below I have posted links to the online and PDF forms of the No Fear Shakespeare version of Macbeth.
    2. No Fear Shakespeare is a publication that gives you the complete, original text and language of Macbeth on the left-hand page, side-by-side with an easy-to-understand translation on the right.
    3. No Fear Shakespeare ONLINE
    4. No Fear Shakespeare PDF
  2. Filled out the S.I.F.T Chart for Act 1, Scene 3, Lines 30-90
    1. Handed out the following worksheet to the class: Macbeth PLOT/SIFT Chart
    2. Download (PDF, 66KB)

      1. Students were split into groups of 3-4 and each groups worked with each other to fill out the SIFT Chart for Act 1, Scene 3, Lines 30-90. The designated boxes on the SIFT Chart are listed below.
        1. Box 1 (Symbol): Simile, metaphor, euphemism, symbol, hyperbole, understatement, imagery
        2. Box 2 (Imagery): imagery, personification, onomatopoeia, allusion, motif
        3. Box 3 (Figurative Language): parallelism, repetition, paradox, assonance, alliteration, rhetorical question
        4. Box 4 (Theme): What possible themes is this scene addressing? (look at your topic list on your pink Character Chart for ideas) Remember, to make a topic into a theme, ask yourself: “What does Shakespeare think about that topic?”
        5. Box 5 (Then): Elaborate/explain how specific moments or specific examples of figurative language help us to see or understand that whatever theme you chose in Box 4
    3. As a class, we then read the rest of Scene 3 from the modern text (right side) of Macbeth.
      1. IN the same groups as before, filled out the PLOT part of the chart for Act 1, Scene 3 (this time the PLOT of the whole scene, not just a specific section)

**IF YOU WERE ABSENT: Read Act 1, Scenes 3 by clicking the links above to be prepared to start where we left off last time and fill out your PLOT/SIFT Chart as indicated in the above daily outline


Monday, March 13 (A-Day) + Tuesday, March 14 (B-Day)

No Journal Prompt Today

Read the following instructions on the worksheet below (Act 1, Scene 7 Packet) and you will know what was accomplished in class: 

Download (PDF, 429KB)

*This worksheet is due next time!

  1. Need to read Act 1, Scene 7 or missing materials?
    1. Macbeth: Act 1, Scene 7 Reading
      1. No Fear Shakespeare is a publication that gives you the complete, original text and language of Macbeth on the left-hand page, side-by-side with an easy-to-understand translation on the right.
      2. No Fear Shakespeare ONLINE
      3. No Fear Shakespeare PDF
    2. Macbeth PLOT/SIFT Chart

Wednesday, March 15 (A-Day) + Thursday, March 16 (B-Day)

No Journal Prompt Today

  1. Today in class we went over Act 2 in Shakespeare’s Macbeth!
  2. Read the following summary of Act 2 to understand the events of this section of the play to prepare our knowledge for watching video adaptation of the play
    1. Macbeth Act 2 Summary
  3. We then watched the following adaptations of Act 2 from Macbeth:
  4. VIDEO 1: Macbeth by Shakespeare’s Globe Theater Company. Directed by Eve Best (2013)
    1. **This video is not available electronically for free and can either be purchased at https://globeplayer.tv/videos/macbeth-english OR make an appointment with Ms. Whiting and you are welcome to watch it for free during lunch or after school to make up those points
      1. Act II Starts at minute 29:45, Ends at minute 52:25
        1. SKIP THE PORTER SCENE: minute 39:25-43:25
    2. While watching the video, students filled out observations and notes about what they saw in the video on the following chart:
      1. Synthesizing Multiple Sources: Act II Synthesis Videos
  5. Watched VIDEO 2: Macbeth by PBS Great Performances. Directed by Rupert Goold (2010)
    1. This video can be watched by clicking the following link: Macbeth 2010
      1. Act II Starts at minute 39:25, Ends at minute 59:00
        1. SKIP THE PORTER SCENE: minute 48:10-51:40
  6. Regrouped as a class throughout the videos and after each viewing to discuss major choices the director, costume designers, and actors and actresses made in portraying the play Macbeth in the way that they did
  7. Will finish this worksheet next time!

Friday, March 17 (A-Day) + Monday, March 20 (B-Day)

No Journal Prompt Today

  1. **Vocabulary QUIZ (Figurative Language): #22-32**
  2. Finished watching the videos for the Synthesizing Multiple Sources: Act II Synthesis Videos Worksheet (for access to the videos, see March 15th/16th day outline)
  3. Began the process of discussing how to write a synthesis piece of writing, focusing on a particular topic or theme from Macbeth. The discussed as a class certain observations or evidence (things we saw) from both versions of the adaptations we watched and how their choices to make it as such connected to that theme.
    1. Was only able to get to the finding evidence and elaboration section of the Synthesizing Multiple Sources: Act II Synthesis Videos Worksheet.
    2. **ENTIRE Act II Synthesis Videos Worksheet is due NEXT TIME**

Passed out the following calendar: This is to help you stay aware of what is coming up for the rest of the term and what things are due:

Download (PDF, 132KB)


Tuesday, March 21 (A-Day) + Wednesday, March 22 (B-Day)

  1. No Journal Prompt Today
  2. Due Today:
    1. PLOT/SIFT Packet (Act 1 Scenes 1-2, 3, and 7)
    2. Synthesizing Mult. Sources: Act II Synthesis Videos Worksheet
  3. Finished Act 2 Synthesis Video Worksheet In Class
    1. IF ABSENT, will have to watch videos after school in Ms. Whiting’s room to make this up
  4. Went over the following example of a GOOD synthesis paragraph and discussed the following questions as a class and in partners:
  5. Download (PDF, 150KB)

    1. Introductory Paragraph:
      1. What is the main idea (major claim) that this paper is going to discuss?
      2. What two sources is the writer using? Why should we trust those sources?
      3. What are these two sources’ stance on this topic?
      4. Think about the different types of writing “hook” writers use to draw readers into their papers and topics. What “hooks” or methods does this author use to interest readers into the topic?
      5. Is there any elements of the writer’s opinion here? (Not really, because this is NOT an argument paper –> It is a synthesis paper and it is reporting what other people are saying about the topic instead)
    2. Body Paragraph:
      1. What is the sub-topic (minor claim) being discussed in this section of the paper?
      2. What is Kellerman’s opinion about this sub-topic?
      3. What is Easterbrook’s opinion about this sub-topic?
      4. What transition phrases or word choices does the writer use to transition from one idea to the next or to introduce a new topic?
      5. Where does the writer quote vs. paraphrase and what are the differences?
  6. After going over the good elements of synthesis writing, students traded their own Act 2 Synthesis Video Worksheet paragraphs and read one another’s paragraphs while filling out the peer review sheet below and gave each other pointers on how to improve their writing: 

    Download (PDF, 338KB)

  7. Turned in Act 2 Video Synthesis Worksheet into the class basket
  8. Introduced the upcoming project and discussed the handout below:
    1. Download (PDF, 799KB)

    2. **PLEASE NOTE:
      1. This is a participation activity and requires your attendance. IF YOU ARE NOT GOING TO BE HERE THE NEXT TWO CLASS PERIODS, then you need to let me know in ADVANCE.
        1. If I do not hear from you or a parent, I am assuming you are ditching class and I will take away points as such and you will have to do an even tougher alternative assignment than the one we did in class.
        2. IF YOU DO let me know in advance, here is a “Absent Alternative Assignment”, click the link to know what you have to do:
          1. Frozen Troupe ABSENT Assignment

Thursday, March 23 (A-Day) + Friday, March 24 (B-Day)

  1. No Journal Prompt Today
  2. **TERM 3 JOURNAL CHECK TODAY**
  3. Worked on our Frozen Troupe Scene Project in groups:
    1. Download (PDF, 799KB)

    2. **PLEASE NOTE:
      1. This is a participation activity and requires your attendance. IF YOU ARE NOT GOING TO BE HERE THE NEXT  CLASS PERIOD, then you need to let me know in ADVANCE.
        1. If I do not hear from you or a parent, I am assuming you are ditching class and I will take away points as such and you will have to do an even tougher alternative assignment than the one we did in class.
        2. IF YOU DO let me know in advance, here is a “Absent Alternative Assignment”, click the link to know what you have to do:
          1. Frozen Troupe ABSENT Assignment
    3. *Will perform these next time! 🙂

**TERM 3 HAS ENDED**

FOR UPCOMING TERM 4 MATERIALS: Click the following link OR go back to the ENGLISH menu and click “Term 4”

Term 4 Daily Outlines and Materials